Incidence
Mast cell tumours (MCT) in dogs are very common, accounting for approximately 20% of all skin tumours in dogs. For most dogs, the underlying cause promoting the development of the tumour is not known.

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The patella is the small ovoid shaped bone located at the front of the knee (stifle) joint. It is located within the tendon of the powerful quadriceps muscle and slides within a groove on the lower end of the femur, known as the femoral trochlea. Patella luxation occurs when the patella slips out of this groove.

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Itchy skin is a common problem for many dogs. It can range from the occasional scratch through to severe, debilitating, generalized irritation and infection. Some dogs may have localized skin problems such as just the ears, paws or belly, while other animals may suffer from an all over itch.

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The cruciate ligaments, the cranial and the caudal, of the stifle (knee) joint are cross shaped ligaments that connect the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone). They are located within the stifle joint itself. The cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) is the most commonly injured cruciate ligament. Its role is to help maintain a normal relationship between the femur and the tibia in all angles of motion.

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The pancreas is one of the organs associated with digestion, including digestion of fat and also glucose control. It is located next to the small intestines, stomach and the liver in the front part of the abdomen. It contains granules of inactivated potent digestive enzymes that are activated when released into the intestines allowing the breakdown of food particles.

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Are you ready to uncover the breeds that make your dog truly one-of-a-kind? There is now testing available called “Wisdom Panel” that uses DNA analysis to offer breed detection.

When you understand your dog's natural tendencies, you can tailor a training, exercise and nutrition program to his needs.

It is done by a simple blood test at our clinic - Please ask our staff.

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Why Cats have more lives than dogs when it comes to snakebite.

Cats are twice as likely to survive a venomous snakebite than dogs, according to the University of Queensland research.

The research team compared the effects of snake venoms on the blood clotting agents in dogs and cats, hoping to help save the lives of our furry friends.

Snakebite is a common occurrence for pet cats and dogs across the globe and can be fatal.  This is primarily due to a condition called “venom-induced consumptive coagulopathy”-where an animal loses its ability to clot blood and sadly bleeds to death.

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Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease (FLUTD) describes a variety of conditions the affect the bladder and urethra of cats.  Cats with FLUTD most often show signs of difficulty and pain when urinating, increased frequency of urination and blood in the urine.  They also tend to lick themselves excessively and may urinate outside the litter box, often on cool, smooth surfaces like a tiled floor or bath.

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Just like humans, cats can also develop Hypertension, which is the medical term for high blood pressure. Hypertension is a condition seen in older cats whereby blood pressure increases and can have harmful secondary effects on other organs around the body including the eyes, kidneys and heart.

Hypertension is often seen as an effect of other diseases, cats with hypertension may be showing signs attributable to their underlying problem.  Causes of hypertension can include kidney disease, endocrine or hormonal diseases, idiopathic (unknown cause)/spontaneous and “White coat effect”.

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